What makes a General Practice position attractive to GPs

12 March 2019 | Clinic Owners and Practice Managers | 4 minutes read

What makes a General Practice position attractive to GPs

While the department of Health’s believe that there is an oversupply of GPs in metropolitan areas, we see a very different picture when talking to clients. We have observed that for some locations in particular it is harder than ever to fill a GP Vacancy. We have more requests from practices to find them GPs than we can manage.

And with the introduction of the Visas for GPs Initiative which came into effect on 11th March 2019 the challenges are likely to get harder.

As you can see below in the table from Seek, job ad growth has massively increased over the last 8 years. In essence, there are more advertisers or competition for that matter and at the same time the government makes it harder to recruit GPs from abroad.

make practice more attractive to GPs
Source: Source: SEEK Employment Trends 12 months vs Previous Year
(Comparing Oct 17 – Sept 18 vs Oct 16 – Sept 17)

What can you do to find qualified GPs in this crowded marketplace?

Due to the already high, and increasing competition, your job offer needs to stand out from the crowd. In this article we intend to show you how you can make your GP positions more attractive.

#1 Percentage of billings

The results of our 2018 GP salary survey clearly show the number one reason for GPs to move to another practice is to earn more money. The road to become a fully qualified general practitioner is very long, it requires hard work and the educational path doesn’t come cheap. Not surprisingly, GPs want to earn as much money as they can once they finally enter the workforce.

Our survey has revealed that the most common rate of pay is 70% of billings, followed by 65%. So what percentage should you be aiming for? Generally said, the higher the better. GPs know very well that the percentage of billings isn’t the only factor that determines their earnings. If your practice is already very busy, you could give a rough indication of how many patients the GP will see daily, or how many patients you are turning away a day.

#2 The physical practice

Like most people GPs appreciate working in a clean and modern environment, a place they feel proud coming to work at. Things like have a window in their consult room, or a good computer and printer – are often very important.

Is there anything you can do to improve the physical environment at your practice? New paint, carpets or desks? They can all make a difference.

#3 Team culture & management support

Your practice environment depends on several factors, including management styles, hierarchies, practice culture, level of support and team personalities. Workplace culture greatly influence employee satisfaction and for many people the work environment is more important than earnings.

So when you advertise a position you really want to point out the aspects that make for a good team environment in your practice. It’s also helpful to mention whether your GPs are supported by practice nurses and how they assist with patients.

#4 On the job development

GPs are often interested in the experience they can gain from mentorship in a specialty area of medicine. Does your practice have a skin care specialist that could teach an incoming GP? Is there an opportunity to watch and learn other skills such as cosmetics, contraceptive insertion, minor procedures etc?

#5 Working hours

Most GPs prefer to work during normal working hours for obvious reasons. Higher pay for after hours work is an essential if you want people to work unsocial hours.

If you are desperate to fill a position quickly it’s best to be flexible with working hours. This way your job ad is not ruled out by GPs who have set their mind on particular days and hours.

Unless you need someone for after-hours only, it’s best to bargain over working hours in the interview. You might have to make concessions with the hours you initially planned for but if you do, it’s more likely the doctor will be more flexible to meet your needs too.

#6 On the job development

GPs are often interested in the experience they can gain from mentorship in a specialty area of medicine. Does your practice have a skin care specialist that could teach an incoming GP? Is there an opportunity to watch and learn other skills such as cosmetics, contraceptive insertion, minor procedures etc?

Closing words

We offer 2 consulting services that are designed to help practices more effective market themselves to GPs. For more information about our consulting packages:

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